KEEPING IN TOUCH

Hello everyone,

Today was meant to be the day we would all hear that Step 4, the final unlocking was going to take place, as scheduled, on Monday 21st June.  But as we now all know – that isn’t going to take place.

So where does that leave us as far as everything we have planned for the remainder of this season?

At the moment, this is how things stand:

  • Tuesday 14th June – Daytime Voices rehearsal at the Albert Hall. This has been cancelled.
  • Saturday 19th June 1.30 – 5.30pm – Youth Windband Workshop afternoon at the Albert Hall.  Still going ahead and places available. Visit here to sign up https://www.music-for-everyone.org/event/youth-wind-band-workshop
  • Sunday 20th June 1.30 – 5.30pm – Youth String Workshop afternoon at the Albert Hall. Still going ahead and places available. Visit here to sign up https://www.music-for-everyone.org/event/youth-string-workshop
  • Sunday 27th June 10am – 5pm – Adult Singing Workshop at the Albert Hall. ‘Let all the world in every corner Sing!’  We are awaiting guidance from Making Music, the national organisation which represents amateur music making societies, to see if this can still go ahead.  More information to follow very soon.
  • Saturday 10th July 10am – 5.30pm – Adult Playing Workshop at the Albert Hall. ‘Blow the dust off your Instrument’. Still going ahead and places available.  Visit here to sign up https://www.music-for-everyone.org/event/blow-the-dust-off-your-instrument-3
  • Saturday 17th July 1.30 – 4.30pm – Family Sing Workshop afternoon at the Albert Hall. We are awaiting guidance from Making Music to see if this can still go ahead. More information to follow very soon.
  • Monday 9th – Wednesday 11th August – MfE Summer School at Trent College.  We are keeping our fingers crossed that all restriction will have been lifted by August – so – still going ahead and places available.  Visit here to sign up https://www.music-for-everyone.org/event/summer-school-2021

We hope things will be clearer by next week – in the meantime, we try and stay optimistic and positive!

Have a good week.

With all best wishes

Angela


Have a good week!

Your friends at MfE.

14/06/2021

admin@music-for-everyone.org

www.music-for-everyone.org | 0115 9589312

10 Goose Gate | Hockley | NG1 1FF

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#MfEMondays are Music for Everyone’s weekly emails designed to keep you up to date with MfE events & to circulate interesting finds, special features, and motivational moments for your Mondays! We are aiming to send out something new each week.

KEEPING IN TOUCH

Hello everyone

I hope you are all keeping well, and with the children going back to school today, we are now all on the route map to normality – perhaps!

Looking to the future.

Our plans for workshops at the Albert Hall are coming together well.

Singing Day on Sunday 27 June – information emailed to all singers this coming Wednesday (10th March)

Blow the Dust off your Instrument Playing Day on Saturday 10 July – information emailed to all players this coming Friday (12th March)

Family Singing Afternoon on Sunday 23rd May – information coming out in next week’s MfEMondays (15th March)

Signing up for all these course will be via our website and will be a very straightforward process. 

Something to look forward to!  Keep your fingers crossed nothing goes wrong.

With all best wishes

Angela



Have a good week!

Your friends at MfE.

08/03/2021

admin@music-for-everyone.org

www.music-for-everyone.org | 0115 9589312

10 Goose Gate | Hockley | NG1 1FF

Like us on Facebook

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#MfEMondays are Music for Everyone’s weekly emails designed to keep you up to date with MfE events & to circulate interesting finds, special features, and motivational moments for your Mondays! We are aiming to send out something new each week.

Congratulations to all those involved in last Saturday’s performance of the Brahms Requiem at the Albert Hall.  Thankfully the Nottingham Festival Chorus’ performance was more successful than the work’s premiere in which the timpanist apparently misread p (quiet) for ff (very loud) and drowned out the rest of the orchestra!

Click here for William Ruff’s 4* review in the Nottingham Post.

  • Our Nottingham Youth Bands and East Midlands Youth String Orchestra have been successful in an application to take part in the Music for Youth Festival in Sheffield on 17 March.  This is a prestigious, nationwide event and it is a great achievement to have been selected to perform.  Watch this space for more information on how the groups get on.
  • While we’re still in a Brahmsian frame of mind (yes, it’s a real word!), check out this Fast and Friendly guide to Brahms, or if you’d prefer something a bit more relaxing watch this video of a cellist soothing fellow transatlantic passengers to sleep with his rendition of Brahms’ Lullaby!

Have a good week!

Your friends at MfE.

03/02/2020

admin@music-for-everyone.org

www.music-for-everyone.org | 0115 9589312

10 Goose Gate | Hockley | NG1 1FF

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*Support us with easyfundraiser*

#MfEMondays are Music for Everyone’s new weekly emails designed to keep you up to date with MfE events & to circulate interesting finds, special features, and motivational moments for your Mondays! We are aiming to send out something new each week.

Music Background.

Do you play a musical instrument or recorder? Then join this summer’s Blow the Dust off Your Instrument on Saturday 10 June for a day of ensemble playing – string orchestra, windband, full orchestra, recorder consort. An addition to the programme this year is guidance in the Alexander Technique to ease the aches of practising and performing. We know we’ll all find it beneficial. Music for the day is sent out in advance and we make sure there are parts for players of all abilities between Grades 2 (or equivalent) and 8 and above. Click here for more information and to book your place. An informal concert for family and friends begins at 5.00pm.

If you’re a singer, then  sign up to be part of the Nottingham Festival Chorus (NFC) for a weekend. Perform a range of works accompanied by the Albert Hall’s mighty Binns organ. This is a rare and not to be missed opporunity. Singing Parry’s ‘I was Glad’ will be a spine tingling, exultant experience. Workshops take place on Saturday and Sunday 24/25 June culimating in a splendid concert of music performed by the Festival Chorus, conducted by Angela Kay, the East of England Singers, with guest conductor Jakob Grubbström, and organist Michael Overbury. There will be an informal and unticketed concert at 3.00pm on Sunday 25 June (note the earlier than usual start time).

Our annual, popular and praised Summer School for adult singers and instrumantalists is now open for booking. This rich three-day experience includes workshops, concerts and masterclasses from visiting professionals, and social events. It takes place in the easily accessible and pleasant surroudings of the University of Nottingham and University Park. Each year the School has been greatly enjoyed by participants both local and from as far afield as the US and Australia! Take a look at the programme and book your place. We look forward to seeing you there. Accommodation for delegates from further afield is not part of the package but the luxury Orchard Hotel located at the other end of the campus is currently offering great rates – £189.60 for THREE nights bed and breakfast.

Follow us and join in the conversation on Facebook @mfenotts, Twitter @mfenotts and Instagram @mfe.notts #mfenotts

benvenue-fortepiano-trio-mendelssohn-1338472770-article-0This is the splendid Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, known as Felix Mendlessohn to his friends. He is central to some of Music for Everyone’s autumn adult choral events.

On Saturday 1st October, Angela Kay will lead a choral workshop exploring the riches of Mendelssohn’s oratorio, Elijah. There are only a few places left, so sign up soon if you’d like to come. We’re looking forward to seeing you there for a day of singing simply for the joy of it – no concert, no pressure.

The following Saturday, 8th October, the East of England Singers, also conducted by Angela, will give a concert in St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall. Their programme of religious choral music spans 400 years and will include string orchestral pieces by Mozart and Pärt.

Without Mendelssohn, whose piece Beatus Vir opens the concert, the choral music of J S Bach might have been lost for many more years, even for ever. It’s fitting then that the largest work in the concert will be Bach’s glorious motet, Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied (Sing to the Lord a new song). After the interval the programme travels through the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries with a vareity of well known and lesser known delightful motets. Something for everyone. Click here for tickets.

If you love to sing, Music for Everyone has plenty of choirs for you to join:

Daytime Voices are singing groups based in 5 locations: Southwell, West Bridgford, Wollaton, Sherwood and (new for 2016/17) Ollerton. Although they started this week, you’d still be welcome to join. Click here for info etc.

On Tuesday lunchtimes the Nottingham Lunchtime Choir meets at the Royal Concert Hall for a burst of singing fun. The music ranges from folk and pop to blues and classical.  The rehearsal is short enough to fit into a lunch break for those who work. It doesn’t matter at all if you can’t read music. There will be an exciting opportunity in December to sing in a short concert before the Halle Orchestra’s Christmas Concert. More here.

The East of England Singers (EOES) is an auditioned chamber choir and open to new members. Singers need to have good sight reading ability and time to commit to a busy concert schedule of both EOES concerts and Music for Everyone choral events, where they often form the semi-chorus. The ability to make tea is an advantage.

 

cropped-logo_darkblue_green-copy.jpgAs the Indian Summer continued, over 100 singers enjoyed a day of Romantic choral music. There was a relaxed and cheerful mood to the day. For example, Angela said Mendelssohn’s Grant us thy Peace was so beautiful she would like it to be sung at her funeral!

P1110399It was good to have time to look at the pieces in depth and learn some singing techniques. Angela and Alex talked about the importance of supporting the breath with those abdominal muscles. (Did anyone see Strictly? Weren’t there some abs on view!) We considered the importance of posture, and how to lift the sounds of our voices from strangled-cat in the throat to beautiful and resonating in the mouth.

After the tea break we muddled up to sit next to someone singing any part but our own. This encouraged us to listen to the other parts and blend with them, while also concentrating on our performance – no hanging onto the sound-tails of our neighbours! Although a little daunting, it proved enjoyable. The tuning improved and there was more expression and musicality. Angela stopped conducting to encourage us to listen to each other P1110404even more. The front two rows then turned round and faced the back three and we sang the piece again, just as a small group would do. Fantastic.

The next Nottingham Festival Chorus event will be the January course for the February concert of Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis. Angela enthused about what a great work it is but also mentioned that it is one of the harder pieces in the choral repertoire, and so singers will need to be well prepared before the course: no sight reading on the first day of the course! Singing done, we went home to the rugby. Nuff said.

cropped-logo_darkblue_green-copy.jpg “Inspiration is a guest that does not willingly visit the lazy.” Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Tchaikovsky (1840-1893) was a prolific composer: ballet scores, e.g. Swan Lake and The Nutcracker, concerti for the shviolin and piano, six symphonies and other orchestral works. He wrote songs, instrumental music and opera, the best known of which is Eugene Onegin. He was a troubled man from a young age until his death. Whether he died from natural causes or suicide remains a point of conjecture. He wrote music of passion and deep emotion, but by no means all melancholic. Music, it’s good for the soul.

The original version of Legend (Легенда) (also known as Crown of Roses), which we will be singing on Saturday, appeared first in Tchaikovsky’s 1882 collection, 16 Songs for Children.  He arranged it for SATB chorus in 1889. The words tell a legendary story of children meeting with Jesus. The verses foreshadow the Easter story, yet the piece is often sung at Christmas, perhaps because it begins “When Jesus Christ was yet a child”.

No doubt we will be looking at how to make the oh so important opening of Legend sound beautiful. ‘When’ is not an easy word to start on, it can easily sound from too far back, in the throat and a bit strangled. The soft and breathy consonants of ‘wh’ can be lost. A further problem is that the note for both ‘When’ and ‘Je-‘ is the same, and  whenever a note is repeated, there is a risk that the second occurrence will come out a shade flat. This can be compounded by a descending phrase, which is just what the sopranos have. Preventing the tuning slipping downwards comes by supporting the breath with the body – firm up those abs and support the diaphragm folks – and the mind. The mind? Yes! Think up and hold up, and all being well the notes will stay in tune. See what you think of the opening in this version:

 

This is the final Simply Romantic blog post before the day itself, but you might like to take a look at these videos in the meantime. See you all on Saturday, we’re looking forward to it. There will be a review entry of the day itself and then news about the East of England Singers’ concert on the 17th of October at St John’s, Carrington – Purcell, Mozart, Bruckner and Stravinsky. Voices, drums, woodwind and brass. Not to be missed!

(If you are reading this blog post in the emailed format, the video of Legend may not show. Click through to the website to watch it.)

 

cropped-logo_darkblue_green-copy.jpgFor a change of mood and style, let’s go to the opera. Alexander Borodin was a doctor and chemistry professor at the St Petersburg Academy of Medicine. This left him with little time for composition, and though he worked on his vibrant opera, Prince Igor, for 18 years, he was unable to complete it before his death in 1887, aged 54. Thankfully, his composer friends Rimsky-Korsakov and Glazunov set to work on Borodin’s manuscript.

Borodin_by_Repin-2‘Glazunov … was to fill in all the gaps in Act III and write down from memory the Overture  played so often by the composer, while I was to orchestrate, finish composing, and systematise all the rest that had been left …’ (from Rimsky-Korskov’s Chronicle of My Musical Life, 1909)

From the LBSO programme notesPrince Igor is based on a Russian epic from the twelfth century. It recounts the story of the heroic Russian warrior, Prince Igor, who goes to war with the Polovtsi, a Tatar warrior tribe. When a sudden eclipse of the sun foreshadows the defeat of Igor’s army, the Prince is captured by the Polovtsi’s Khan, who attempts to seduce Igor into joining forces with him by means of the sensuous dancing of the Polovtsian slave maidens. Igor, however, manages to escape and rejoin his faithful wife.

We’ll be singing two choruses from the Act that includes the Polovtsian slaves – so up to 5mins 45seconds in the video, but enjoy the rest if you have time to. Might there be dancing on Saturday? Who knows!

 

cropped-logo_darkblue_green-copy.jpgSergey or Sergei? Rachmaninov or Rachmaninoff? The information suggests his family, part of the Russian pre-revolution bourgeoise, spelled their surname the first way originally but changed it on leaving Russia for the West in 1917. Having lost everything in the revolution, Sergei, his wife and children, travelled to Sweden by open sled. He took with him just a few notebooks containing sketches of his compositions. Though born in Russia in 1873, he died in Beverley Hills in 1943 having become an American citizen only a few weeks earlier. Thankfully he had travelled to Europe and the States to perform and conduct whilst still living in Russia, so he found a welcome (and the gift of a Steinway grand piano) awaiting him abroad.

Rachmaninoff plays for his granddaughter, Sophie. 1927. AP PhotosRachmaninoff was a highly talented pianist and composer. His hands were so large he could play, with one hand, chords that spanned 12 white piano keys.

We believe the following story is true, and as it’s a good one, we’ll share it:

At a concert in New York, Rachmaninoff was accompanying the violinist Fritz Kreisler. During the performance Kreisler lost his place in the music, sidled over to Rachmaninoff and said, ‘Where are we?’ Rachmaninoff replied, ‘I don’t know where you are, but I’m in Carnigie Hall.’

The photo, from AP Photo, shows him playing for his granddaughter, Sophie, in 1927.

Rachmaninoff’s dates make him a late Romantic; his music remained rooted in the Russia of his early life. Ave Maria, which we’ll be looking at during Simply Romantic, comes from his Vespers (All-night Vigil), composed during the turmoils of 1915. The title Ave Maria suggests we’ll be singing it in Latin rather than the original Russian, but you never know what Angela and Alex have in store for us…! Have a listen to both versions. What do you think about the different marriages of language and music? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comment box below. First Russian:

Now Latin:

(Watch out for the choirboy singing while holding a bunch of flowers !?!)

cropped-logo_darkblue_green-copy.jpgWhat shall we be singing during the Simply Romantic workshop? (Saturday 3rd October)

Well, a variety of pieces including Dvořák’s Kyrie from his Mass in D major, Rachmaninoff’s Ave Maria, Tchaikovsky’s Legend, Mendelssohn’s Grant us thy Peace and opera choruses, including extracts from Borodin’s Prince Igor. 

dvorak

Antonín Leopold Dvořák 

Born September 8, 1841, in Nelahozeves, Bohemia
Died May 1, 1804, in Prague

Although Dvořák learnt to play the piano and violin (later viola) at an early age, the organ became his main instrument of study. As he built his career in music, he played his various instruments in restaurants and churches, at balls, for theatres, the opera and concerts – everything from folk music to classical. By the late 1870s he was earning enough from prizes and commissions to devote more time to composition than to playing and teaching.

YouTube is a great source of performances, some with video, some without. Some good, some not so good. They can be useful when learning a piece or just to sing along with for the fun of it. First up, Dvořák’s Kyrie.