Our new season is getting off to a great start with all of our regular rehearsing groups getting back together for the new season. This weekend saw three of our Youth Groups starting again – East Midlands Youth String Orchestra – conductor Richard Howarth, Strictly Strings – conductor Abi Smith and the East Midlands Youth Windband – conductor Phil Smith. All three groups met at NTU, Clifton at 2:00 yesterday afternoon and more information can be found on our website – https://www.music-for-everyone.org/whats-on/youth-music/

For those interested in stringed instruments, the first clear record of a
violin-like instrument comes from paintings by Gaudenzio Ferrrari.  In his Madonna of the Orange Tree, painted 1530, a cherub is seen playing a bowed instrument which clearly has the hallmarks of violins.  A few years later, on a fresco inside the cupola of the church of Madonna dei Miracoli in Saronno angels play three instruments of the violin family, corresponding to violin, viola and cello. The instruments Ferrari depicts have bulging front and back plates, strings which feed into peg-boxes with side pegs, and f-holes. They do not have frets. The only real difference between these instruments and the modern violin is that Ferrari’s have three strings, and a rather more extravagant curved shape.

Horsehair graces the bow for violins and cellos, and each bow has about 150 individual hairs. Horsehair has many small bumps that cannot be seen with the naked eye, and those bumps create the friction that produces the characteristic subtle weeping tone of the violin. The most popular horsehair, which is said to produce a good tone, is white horsehair from Mongolia.

Yet, this claim seems based mostly on the fact that horse breeding is a bustling industry in Mongolia, and their horses have relatively long, bushy tails for their height, making them a perfect source of horsehair. Yet, the horse sacrifices the hair of his tail for the sake of the tone of the violin, which is a bit sad. Who was it that said that when they play the violin they can hear the braying of a horse?


A double bass player arrived a few minutes late for the first rehearsal of the local choral society’s annual performance of Handel’s Messiah. He picked up his instrument and bow and turned his attention to the conductor. The conductor asked, “Would you like a moment to tune?” The bass player replied with some surprise, “Why? Isn’t it the same as last year?”


Have a good week!

Your friends at MfE.

16/09/2019

admin@music-for-everyone.org

www.music-for-everyone.org | 0115 9589312

10 Goose Gate | Hockley | NG1 1FF

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#MfEMondays are Music for Everyone’s new weekly emails designed to keep you up to date with MfE events & to circulate interesting finds, special features, and motivational moments for your Mondays! We are aiming to send out something new each week.

With this year being the 150th anniversary of the death of Hector Berlioz, we’re looking forward to performing Villanelle from his Les Nuits d’ete with Emma Brown at the Albert Hall on 12 October.

In contrast to the sinister psychopath in the BBC’s popular drama Killing Eve, Berlioz’s Villanelle is a carefree and flirtatious character who sings of love and the joys of spring!

The scoring of Villanelle is modest by Berlioz standards.  Berlioz was famed for his use of large orchestral forces (his last opera Les Troyens was so large it was never performed in his lifetime!), and his championing of unusual instruments such as the Octobass.

Click here to hear the Jaws theme played on the Octobass!!

https://www.cmuse.org/jaws-theme-octobass/

Have a good week!

Your friends at MfE.

09/09/2019

admin@music-for-everyone.org

www.music-for-everyone.org | 0115 9589312

10 Goose Gate | Hockley | NG1 1FF

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#MfEMondays are Music for Everyone’s new weekly emails designed to keep you up to date with MfE events & to circulate interesting finds, special features, and motivational moments for your Mondays! We are aiming to send out something new each week.

If you can’t view this email properly or you would like to unsubscribe from future #MfEMondays emails, please get in touch.

Well, what a year 2018/19 was for Music for Everyone! Here are just some of the office team’s favourite highlights from the past year:

Summer School – an amazing 3 days of music making celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing, all brilliantly captured on our blog by Helena (just in case you missed it!).

National Lottery Grant for Open Voices – an incredible £10,000 was awarded to MfE to help support the future of our 3 Open Voices groups.

Big Youth Music Experience – 6 months of events for young singers and players, culminating in the BIG weekend in July and plenty of radio/tv appearances (Robin’s a pro now!)

Sherwood Open Voices: Les Misérables – Sherwood Daytime Voices joined Open Voices for a spectacular performance of Les Mis, featuring solos from the choir members and amazing costumes for Sherwood Art Week, raising over £200 to boot for Open Voices!

The office is buzzing with the excitement of the new season starting soon, if you are in one of our regular groups, check out all the term dates on the website: http://www.music-for-everyone.org/whats-on/adult-music/ and http://www.music-for-everyone.org/whats-on/youth-music/

The Autumn term is filling up nicely and more details for events in 2020 (…yes, it really is 2020!…) will be coming out very soon. We’re looking forward to seeing you all over the next year for more MUSICAL HIGHLIGHTS!

Have a good week!

Your friends at MfE.

02/09/2019

admin@music-for-everyone.org

www.music-for-everyone.org | 0115 9589312

10 Goose Gate | Hockley | NG1 1FF

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#MfEMondays are Music for Everyone’s new weekly emails designed to keep you up to date with MfE events & to circulate interesting finds, special features, and motivational moments for your Mondays! We are aiming to send out something new each week.

To subscribe, please email admin@music-for-everyone.org

Welcome back! We hope all that attended the Summer School last week enjoyed it as much as we did – what a Voyage of Discovery we had! If you missed any of the action, we had a blog running over the 3 days which can be seen on our website – lots of great photos too! http://www.music-for-everyone.org/about-us/blog/

After a few days off, the MfE team is back and looking forward to the next season of music-making, we will be bringing you full details very soon!

In the meantime… why don’t you check out some of the other musical events happening in the East Midlands? We regularly promote 3rd party events and opportunities through a special page on our website – take a look for yourself, or perhaps a family member, there are opportunities for adult and youth alike!

https://www.music-for-everyone.org/whats-on/third-party-events-and-opportunities/

  • The Great British Bake Off starts again next week, have a look at these very realistic ‘too good to eat’ musical cakes! Musical cakes
  • Musical Joke of the Week:

Have a good week!

Your friends at MfE.

19/08/2019

admin@music-for-everyone.org

www.music-for-everyone.org | 0115 9589312

10 Goose Gate | Hockley | NG1 1FF

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#MfEMondays are Music for Everyone’s new weekly emails designed to keep you up to date with MfE events & to circulate interesting finds, special features, and motivational moments for your Mondays! We are aiming to send out something new each week.

To subscribe, please email admin@music-for-everyone.org

Just a little #MfEMonday to say…

Next week, the MfE Office will be closed due to all staff attending our annual Summer School from Monday to Wednesday, followed by a well-deserved few days off before preparing for our new season! However, all 3 of our Bookwise shops (City Centre, Southwell and Newark) will still be open and if you are still in need of a good book for your holidays, why not pop in and say hello to our lovely volunteers!

All the book shops stock a wide range of reading material, from dictionaries to novels, biographies to cookbooks – as well as sheet music for all abilities and CDs.

The Summer School will be taking place in the beautiful Nottingham High School and we are really looking forward to a fantastic 3 days of music-making. We also have talented special guests Scaramella, Hilary Campbell, the Miyabi Duo and Zephyr joining us to take workshops and recitals. The Lunchtime Recital Series and Summer School Showcase Concert are open to all so why not pop along! http://www.music-for-everyone.org/event/ss-concerts-19/

PROMS THEME!

  • The Proms 2019 are off! Click here to find out 10 extraordinary facts about the history.
  • Ever wondered what the conductor looks like during a performance to the orchestra? Click here to see 10 conductors having the time of their lives at the 2017 Proms…!

Have a good week!

Your friends at MfE.

05/08/2019

admin@music-for-everyone.org
www.music-for-everyone.org | 0115 9589312
10 Goose Gate | Hockley | NG1 1FF

Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
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*Support us with easyfundraiser*


#MfEMondays are Music for Everyone’s new weekly emails designed to keep you up to date with MfE events & to circulate interesting finds, special features, and motivational moments for your Mondays! We are aiming to send out something new each week.

To subscribe, please email admin@music-for-everyone.org

aviva-community-fund-banner-600x160Voting is open!

We have applied for £5000 for our SOUND WAVES  – music for wellbeing – programme, now we need your votes to (hopefully) bring that money to Music for Everyone:

  • more Open Voices (singing groups for adults with learning disabilities)
  • music sessions for teenagers with cancer in the Teenage Cancer Trust unit at Nottingham Children’s Hospital, QMC
  • and other projects currently in the planning stages

Hogarth-nurse-base210 votes are allocated to every registered email address. We hope you’ll use all 10 (which you can) for Sound Waves and share your love of music-making.

Click on VOTE and, well, vote. Vote in less time than it takes to make a cuppa. Persist if the site’s busy, or try again later.

DSC04631Ask your friends, relatives, colleagues, fellow dog walkers, shop assistants, the postman, anyone you can think of, to vote, vote, vote for SOUND WAVES! Let’s share the joy of music-making! And copy and paste this link https://www.avivacommunityfund.co.uk/voting/project/view/17-4115  into an email, send a ’round robin’ to your entire address book asking them to vote too. You get the picture.

 

 

P1110860 copy No, that’s not the translation, it’s ‘We praise thee, O God!’ and comes from an ancient Christian Hymn known as Te Deum. Its joyful words are still in use, mainly at the service of Morning Prayer. Unusually, Dvorak didn’t compose his setting of Te Deum for church use but for the concert hall – Carnegie Hall. He had been commissioned to write a work befitting the 400th anniversay celebration of Columbus’s discovery of America, which is also why Dvorak added words of blessing to the end of the text.

The two hundred and twenty singers of the Nottingham Festival Chorus spent today polishing both Te Deum and Haydn’s beautiful yet striking Nelson Mass. Along with Dvorak’s P1110863 copyCarnival Overture these form the programme of a concert next Saturday, 4th February at 7.3opm, at Nottingham’s Albert Hall. All the music is music to lift the spirits, lighten the heart and gladden the soul – what more could be wanted in the middle of winter (and other unmentionables)? Click here to buy your ticket(s) . If you’re in the choir, buy them for friends and family at tomorrow’s rehearsal.

Sometimes translations are included in published music but sometimes not, as with Te Deum, so here are the words the choir has been rehearsing in Latin along with the English translation. The subdivisions of the text are those chosen by Dvorak.

 

1.Te Deum laudamus: te Dominum confitemur.
Te aeternum patrem, omnis terra veneratur.
Tibi omnes Angeli: tibi caeli et universae potestates.
Tibi cherubim et seraphim, incessabili voce proclamant:
Sanctus, Sanctus, Sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth.

We praise thee, O God; we acknowledge thee to be the Lord.
All the earth doth worship thee, the Father everlasting.
To thee all angels cry aloud, the heavens and all the powers therein.
To thee cherubin and seraphin continually do cry,
Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Sabaoth.

Sanctus, Sanctus, Sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth.
Pleni sunt caeli et terra maiestatis gloriae tuae.
Te gloriosus Apostolorum chorus,
Te Prophetarum laudabilis numerus,
Te Martyrum candidatus laudat exercitus.
Te per orbem terrarum sancta confitetur Ecclesia:
Patrem immensae maiestatis;
Venerandum tuum verum et unicum Filium;
Sanctum quoque Paraclitum Spiritum.

Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Sabaoth;
Heaven and earth are full of the majesty of thy glory.
The glorious company of the apostles praise thee.
The goodly fellowship of the prophets praise thee.
The noble army of martyrs praise thee.
The holy Church throughout all the world doth acknowledge thee:
the Father of an infinite majesty
thine honourable, true and only Son;
also the Holy Ghost the Comforter.

2.Tu rex gloriae, Christe:
Tu Patris sempiternus es Filius.
Tu, ad liberandum suscepturus hominem,
non horruisti Virginis uterum.

Tu, devicto mortis aculeo,
aperuisti credentibus regna caelorum.
Tu ad dexteram Dei sedes, in gloria Patris.
Iudex crederis esse venturus.
Te ergo quaesumus, tuis famulis subveni:
quos pretioso sanguine redemisti.

Thou art the King of glory, O Christ.
Thou art the everlasting Son of the Father.
When thou tookest upon thee to deliver man,
thou didst not abhor the Virgin’s womb.
When thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death,
thou didst open the kingdom of heaven to all believers.
Thou sittest at the right hand of God, in the glory of the Father.
We believe that thou shalt come to be our judge.

3.Aeterna fac cum sanctis tuis in gloria numerari.
Salvum fac populum tuum, Domine, et benedic hereditati tuae.
Et rege eos, et extolle illos usque in aeternum.
Per singulos dies benedicimus te:
et laudamus nomen tuum in saeculum, et in saeculum saeculi.

Make them to be numbered with thy saints in glory everlasting.
O Lord, save thy people and bless thine heritage.
Govern them and lift them up for ever.
Day by day we magnify thee;
and we worship thy name, ever world without end.

4.Dignare, Domine, die isto sine peccato nos custodire.
Miserere nostri, Domine, miserere nostri.
Fiat misericordia tua, Domine, super nos:
quemadmodum speravimus in te.
In te, Domine, speravi: non confundar in aeternum.
In te, Domine, speravi: non confundar in aeternum.

Vouchsafe, O Lord, to keep us this day without sin.
O Lord, have mercy upon us, have mercy upon us.
O Lord, let thy mercy lighten upon us, as our trust is in thee.
O Lord, in thee have I trusted; let me never be confounded.

Benedicamus Patrem et Filium cum Sancto Spiritu;
Laudemus et superexaltemus eum in saecula. Alleluja.

Blessed be the Father and the Son with the Holy Ghost;
Praise and exalt Him for ever. Alleluia.

English translation: The Book of Common Prayer.
Extracts from The Book of Common Prayer, the rights in which are vested in the Crown, are reproduced by permission of the Crown’s patentee, Cambridge University Press 

We’re delighted that Christmas is Coming, this Sunday’s concert with Vocals, Daytime Voices, East of England Singers and the New Classical Players, has SOLD OUT. There won’t be any tickets available on the door on the day. We’re sorry if you were hoping to come along and are disappointed.

Put a note in your new diary to book next October/November for Christmas is Coming, 2017.

What has Music for Everyone been up to this December?

img_0385-1First there was carol singing in the Market Square on the morning of Saturday 3rd December, and later an East of England Singers and New Classical Brass concert of music for brass and voices. Then on Wednesday there were performances by the East Midlands Youth Windband and Nottingham Youth Voices at the Nottingham Maggie’s Centre Carol Concert – compered by John Hess, who sings tenor in the MfE Nottingham Festival Chorus. Yes, that is a cuddly toy one of the lads is holding in the photo – choir and band did their own version of the John Lewis ad, complete with ‘bouncing’ dogs! The contribution by the youngsters and John was hugely appreciated by Maggie’s. The East of England Singers concert audience also raised £200 for this wonderful charity that supports people affected by cancer, including families and friends.

And what’s still to come?

Coming up on Sunday is the Christmas is Coming concert by Vocals, Daytime Voices, East of England Singers and the orchestra. There are only three, yes three, tickets left at the time of writing!

On Friday 16th December the Girls Voices, Boys Voices and Nottingham Youth Windband perform at their We Wish You a Merry Christmas concert. And finally, on Sunday 18th December, the second and FREE taster sesssion of Strictly Strings, for young string players Grades 2-4 or 5 takes place at Bluecoat Academy from 2.00-5.00pm. Contact the office for details.

Phew! And then it really will be Christmas.

 

 

Today the strings rehearsed with Owen Cox. Owen, like Sheku Kanneh-Mason, came to Music for Everyone’s Stringwise as a boy. He has played in the CBSO and many other orchestras and chamber groups, and teaches at Chetham’s Music School, Manchester. Owen has been a member of several quartets and brought three players along to the Summer School to perform as a quartet, which they do when time and geography permit. The Cox Quartet.

Owen1The four of them gave an open rehearsal. This was a masterclass in chamber music playing. They discussed their working processes to decide on the interpretation of the music – understanding the composer and background to the piece, considering technique to convey the performance both technically as an ensemble and, most importantly, emotionally. They explained how many quartets prefer just to be together to work intensively on the music rather than to socialise. This group is unusual in that Owen is married to Katie Stillman, violinist, and Joe and Ken Ichinose, viola and cello, are brothers. Their enjoyment in being together was evident. Each player highlighted a passage to discuss from either Haydn’s Quartet in E flat Major – Op.64, No. 6 or Mendelssohn’s Quartet in F minor, Op.80. They played a version of it that was perhaps more legato or more articualated, and asked the audience which they preferred and why.

It was a hugely engaging, unique and fascinating experience, and striking that so many of the techniques used in chamber playing apply across all instruments, including the voice. For example, Ken explained that when all four parts are marked forte, it dconcert1id not mean all instruments strived for the same volume. Rather they had to understand the music vertically and work out which part’s forte should be louder, and which parts should play a less loud forte so that the melody or theme was not drowned out. Listening to each other and understanding the music being key.

Katie has an extensive carreer as a soloist, chamber musician and an orchestral principal. She is a member of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, co-leader of Manchester Camerata and regularly leads the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group.

Joe has established a varied freelance career as a violist, playing regulary at the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, and period playing with Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique. He will be playing in a Prom performance later in the series.

Ken co-founded the Galitzin String Quartet, which toured internationally. He is co-artisitic director of the annual ‘Accord et a Cordes’ cheamber music festival near Montpellier, France. Before joining the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra as Associate Principal in 2014, he enjoyed 10 years of freelancing with London orchestras, including the Philharmonia, Academy of St Martin in the Fields, and the Royal Opera House.

As the second day of the Summer School came to a close, the Quartet gave a concert performance of the two quartets rehearsed earlier. Their playing took the audience through the story the music conveyed and touched every emotion imaginable, from reflective to sad, to playful and joyous, all enhanced by their huge delight in playing together. It was an enormous privelege to hear the rehearsal and the performence. Both will stay in the memory for a long time.

conert2