2016 MfE Summer School: Day 2, part 1

MikeWhat a day! The choir beavered away at their repertoire under the tution of Guy Turner, Mike Gregory, Jane McDouall and MfE’s Artistic Director, Angela Kay. Works being rehearsed are by Rutter Birthday Madrigals, Harris And will ‘a not, Deimer Three MadrigalsĀ and Vaughan Williams Serenade to Music. The choir then split into upper and lower voices for sectional rehearsals, where tips were also given about technique. The ladies particularly know a lot more anatomy than before they came, and about posture, breathing, core muscles, etc. Singers who normally sing in larger choral societies have expressed enjoyment in singing more intimate works, often sung by chamber groups.

percussion

The full orchestra rehearsed first thing under the baton (newly purchased from the Winblowers stall in the rehearsal hall) of Phil Smith, and played a medley from Kiss me Kate. Instrumentalist split later into the string orchestra and the windband. More about these groups tomorrow. And more in a second post about the Cox Quartet open rehearsal (masterclass in quartet playing) and their concert.

The sun shone again, so coffee, lunch and tea were taken outside by many. Times to chat with old friends and to make new ones.

After lunch, John Florance, a raconteur with a PhD in English Literature and Drama, and former Radio Leicester presenter, explored the importance of music to Shakespeare, and in his plays. He chose a Shakespeare inspired piece from each musical era from the Bard’s time until today, and showed how his words have inspired music of all genres – opera, song, orchestral, ballet, jazz, musical, rock and pop.

JohnFloranceThe man that hath no music in himself,
Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
Is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils;
The motions of his spirit are dull as night
And his affections dark as Erebus:
Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.

The Merchant of Venice, William Shakespeare.